Treating Mild Cognitive Impairment

Share article:

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on whatsapp
WhatsApp
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) is a condition in which someone has some difficulty with cognition – so, their mental abilities like memory or thinking. It is estimated that between 5 and 20% of people aged over 65 have MCI.

Those living with MCI struggle with cognitive tasks more than a healthy person at their age, but the symptoms are not severe enough to interfere significantly with daily life, and so are not defined as dementia. Only one third of people with MCI go on to develop Alzheimer’s.

Treating MCI, like other memory-related conditions, can be a challenge, particularly for MCI as there is currently no approved drugs to treat the condition. It was initially hoped that medications to treat Alzheimer’s could help treat symptoms of MCI but, despite lots of trials, no clear benefit was seen in patients.

Other treatments are recommended, however. For instance, it is strongly recommended that someone with MCI keeps active, both mentally (for example by doing puzzles or reading) and socially (seeing friends and family).

Recent evidence has suggested that a variety of treatment approaches can help to improve or maintain mental abilities in people with MCI. These approaches include physical activities, learning strategies to improve memory and thinking and receiving and following advice on memory, health, and diet.

Many people who are diagnosed with MCI are often referred to ‘Memory Protection Groups’ for regular sessions to support them with these changes to their cognition.

Although these treatments may help some people, there is still the need for approved medication to treat MCI.

MAC Clinical Research are conducting a study into an existing drug (that was originally developed for asthma) to see if the medication may help with cognition, for example remembering, thinking and problem-solving.

We are currently looking for male and female patients with MCI or memory problems aged 50-80 to participate in this new clinical study. With volunteer participation, strides towards helping people around the world can be made, potentially improving the quality of life for many people living with this condition.

The trial is running at our clinics in Blackpool (Lancashire), Barnsley (South Yorkshire), and Greater Manchester. Eligible participants will receive up to £680. For more information or to register yours or a loved one’s interest, visit our website.

Source: https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/about-dementia/types-dementia/mild-cognitive-impairment-treatments#content-start

Share article:

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on whatsapp
WhatsApp
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn