What is Drug Repurposing?

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what is drug repurposing

Developing new medicine can be a very long process, spanning over years. In fact, on average, it takes at least 15 years for a new medicine to complete its journey from initial discovery to the marketplace. Therefore, alternative methods are often used that can speed up the process of finding new treatments for conditions.

Drug repurposing (or repositioning) is the process of identifying new disease areas for existing drugs that are already on the market.

Drug repurposing is one strategy that can speed up this process. Many drugs approved for other conditions have already been tested in humans, so detailed information is available on their safety, pharmacology, formulation, and potential toxicity. Because repurposing builds upon previous research and development efforts, new candidate therapies could be ready for clinical trials quickly, speeding their review by the Food and Drug Administration and, if approved, their integration into health care.

Drug repurposing has many advantages over traditional drug discovery approaches. It can significantly reduce development time, and as approved medications have been shown to be safe for many people to take, it often avoids the need for large, expensive trials that can take many years to complete.

One notable example of drug repurposing was the development of the drug Viagra®.  Originally tested clinically for hypertension, the drug was repositioned for erectile dysfunction upon observation of a certain side effect in clinical trials.

Previous studies show that these drugs may have the potential to help in the therapy of a variety of diseases that affect the brain. MAC Clinical Research are currently recruiting for a new trial involving the repurposing of an existing drug for asthma in the hope of providing new treatments for people with Parkinson’s and memory-related conditions.

We are currently looking for male and female patients with Parkinson’s Disease, MCI, Parkinson’s with Dementia and Dementia with Lewy Bodies aged 40-80 to participate in this new clinical study. With your participation, you may be helping to contribute to the development of a new treatments that may help improve the quality of life for many people living with these conditions. The trials are running at our clinics in Blackpool (Lancashire), Barnsley (South Yorkshire), and Greater Manchester. Eligible participants will receive up to £680. For more information or to register yours or a loved one’s interest, visit our website.

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