Low Mood & Impotence Clinical Trial

MAC is researching potential new treatments for low mood and impotence

Improving quality of life

Key Information

Reimbursement

£690 plus reasonable travel expenses

Gender and Age

Males aged 18 - 55

Clinics

Greater Manchester

Health Check

Receive a free comprehensive health check

Register Your Interest

Data Privacy Statement
“Whilst there are a range of medical treatments currently available for impotency, they do not work adequately in around 40% of men, particularly where the ED is secondary to other medical conditions such as depression. We are researching into a compound which acts both centrally (on the brain) and in the periphery (muscles and veins). The development of these new treatments can only be possible by the dedicated support of men with issues around ED volunteering to help assess the new treatments at MAC.”
Dr Paul Westhead
Principal Investigator

What Happens Next?

What happens next?

1. Sign Up

Register your interest on our website or over the phone

2. We'll Call You

Our study specialists will call you to discuss your health and check if the trial is suitable for you

3. Eligible?

If eligible, you will be booked in for a 'CHAT' where you'll receive a Patient Information Sheet (PIS)

4. Medical History

If you decide to take part, our medical team will obtain a copy of your medical history from your GP

5. Health Check

You will attend a free comprehensive health check with a MAC doctor and your eligibility will be confirmed

6. Enrollment

You will be enrolled onto the clinical trial and attend scheduled visits (Travel expenses or transport to clinic provided)

About this Low Mood & Impotence Clinical Trial

The study drug is a new compound which works in a different way to current ED treatments by enhancing the effects of substances in the body such as serotonin and dopamine to help stimulate an erection. The study drug is being developed in the hope that it will treat depression and ED in men for whom current treatments either do not work or are poorly tolerated.
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